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There was only John Wayne and his legacy is preserved in the new John Wayne Birthplace Museum that open May 23-25 in Winterset, Iowa. Cover design by Dug Campbell

There was only one John Wayne and his legacy is preserved in the new John Wayne Birthplace Museum that opens May 23-25 in Winterset, Iowa. Cover design by Dug Campbell

Volume 7, Issue No. 4, May/June 2015

 

Few American icons are as deeply embedded in our nation’s collective conscious as John Wayne. His enduring masculine image, beliefs, morals, patriotism, rugged individualism and unwavering popularity 36 years after his death continue to be a unifying force within our society and they serve as a powerful reminder of his Iowa roots that helped shape him as an adult. So it is befitting that the new John Wayne Birthplace Museum — the only museum in the world devoted to preserving Wayne’s immense legacy — is built and will host its grand opening May 22-25 in Winterset, Iowa, where “Duke” was born. Read Iowa History Journal Publisher and Editor Michael Swanger’s story about the new museum and his interviews with Wayne’s daughter, Aissa, the museum’s executive director Brian Downes (a friend of Wayne’s) and country music superstar Marty Stuart, who headlines the museum’s benefit dinner.

 

IHJ brings you the final installment in the three-part series, Governors of influence, examining the six most prominent. Featured are Robert Ray who used his heartfelt and pragmatic leadership to manage the state for nearly a decade-and-a-half. You’ll discover how an inspirational teacher and a book set the political compass for a young Terry Branstad and his governorship that stretches across four different decades. By Jerry Harrington

 

Explore our aviation legacy at the Iowa Aviation Museum in Greenfield. Had it not been for many Iowa contributions in the early 1900s, those flying over Iowa today may very well have not been flying at all. By John Busbee

 

Learn about Bernard Coyne, ‘The Giant of the World’ who suffered from a condition known as Daddy Long-Legs syndrome and grew to 8 feet, 2 inches tall from Michael Swanger in Publisher’s Perspective.

 

Find out about the day Babe Ruth came to town and how the Parker Historical Society in Clay County is celebrating its rich baseball tradition with a full season events. By John Skipper

 

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